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Lloyd LP 300

After World War II. Steel was not available in large quantities so this Lloyd was made of plywood covered with imitation leather. The texture of the bodywork soon earned the Lloyd the nickname of ‘Leukoplastbomber’ (Band-Aid Bomber) in Germany.

It’s truly remarkable that a car of this kind is displayed here in such good condition. After all, this was the sort of car that was discarded as soon as something better became available.

This Lloyd LP 300 does look as if it were cobbled together, which isn’t surprising given the lack of materials and funds in Germany after World War II. Steel was not available in large quantities so this Lloyd with its small 300 cc engine was made of plywood covered with imitation leather.

However, as soon as restrictions were lifted, Lloyd switched to a more conventional steel version, which was introduced in 1954 and produced until the 1960s.
The Lloyd was manufactured by the Borgward company. At a time when many large factories tried to resume production with pre-war models, some manufacturers launched small cars to try and get the country back on wheels. Borgward had taken over the Hansa-Lloyd marque in 1929, hence the name of this car.

What else is there to see? Exhibitions